Thursday, August 30, 2012

[HOAX] Samsung Pays $1B to Apple with 30 Truck Loads of 5 Cent Coins

This morning more than 30 trucks filled with 5-cent coins arrived at Apple’s headquarters in California. Initially,  the security company that protects the facility said the trucks were in the wrong place, but minutes later, Tim Cook (Apple CEO) received a call from Samsung CEO explaining that  they will pay $1 billion dollars for the fine recently ruled against the South Korean company in this way. The funny part is that the signed document does not specify a single payment method, so Samsung is entitled to send the creators of the iPhone their billion dollars in the way they deem best.
This dirty but genius geek troll play is a new headache to Apple executives as they will need to put in long hours counting all that money, to check if it is all there and to try to deposit it crossing fingers to hope a bank will accept all the coins.
Lee Kun-hee, Chairman of Samsung Electronics, told the media that his company is not going to be intimidated by a group of “geeks with style” and that if they want to play dirty, they also know how to do it.
You can use your coins to buy refreshments at the little machine for life or melt the coins to make computers, that’s not my problem, I already paid them and fulfilled the law.
A total of 20 billion coins, delivery hope to finish this week.
On to the debunking.
  1. Samsung's fine ($1.049bn) isn't yet payable; the judge hasn't ruled. All we have is the jury's verdict. The judge's decision, which could include a tripling of the fine, is due on 20 September (or possibly 6 December now; it's unclear). Until then, Samsung only has to pay its lawyers. That should be less than $1bn.
  2. If Samsung tried to pay the fine in five-cent coins, Apple could legitimately tell the trucks to turn around and head back to Samsung (if the trucks weren't imaginary in the first place). So, basically it would be Apple's choice whether it accepted the payment. (In the UK, the rules are stricter: "legal tender" - meaning payment for a court-ordered debt - mean, says the Royal Mint, that 5ps are only legal tender for amounts up to £5, for example. It's only when you get to £1 that you can pay debts up to "any amount".
  3. Some more fact-checking from Ken Tindell via Twitter : "A nickel weighs 5g. It would take 2,755 18-wheeler trucks (max legal tare 80,000 lbs) to carry the money."
The story appears to have originated on "humour" site 9gag, which Mobile Entertainment describes succinctly as "a place normally reserved for z-list memes and screenshots of Facebook statuses." Yup, this one fits that.


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